Agonizomai: Lecture of the Week<br>History of Christianity -1500-1700 AD

Sunday, November 01, 2009

Lecture of the Week
History of Christianity -1500-1700 AD
The following lecture comes to us from Michael Haykin. This is his second week in the last three on the blog. It is indeed unusual here at Agonizomai to post two "Sermon of the Week" audio files by the same speaker in such close proximity, but it is the occasion of Reformation Day that causes us to look for something instructive and reliable relating to Reformation times. Since Dr. Haykin is Adjunct Professor of Church History and Spirituality at Toronto Baptist Seminary, he seemed a very suitable source for our purpose.

This lecture concentrates mostly on Martin Luther and events surrounding and following his great personal epiphany concerning the grace of God. There are many interesting epithets and tid-bits in this, but they mainly serve to frame the whole thing in human terms and to remind us of the common humanity that we share with people in past ages. Haykin is quite ready to present our predecessors "warts and all", which lends great credibility to his observations. Enjoy this one as you celebrate around Reformation Day.



No Other Foundation (1500-1700) Michael Haykin


[Dr. Haykin maintains some other interesting church history audio files and sermons here and here]



4 Comments:

Blogger Derek Ashton said...

Tony,

There are so many lessons to learn from Church History ... and among all the qualified people to present them, you managed to find a Canadian!

My church has been blessed with a Church History Sunday school class that is now in its 12th week, I think. The teacher is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute, and he's opened my eyes to quite a few things. For those interested, the audio of the class lectures can be found at www.thefiveflachs.org.

The last lecture was about Luther (I didn't like it much, I'll admit - mainly for what it left out), and the next in the series is Calvinism v. Arminianism. Oh boy, I can't wait for that.

My church has a soundly Reformed pastor, and also some dear old Arminian saints (mostly retired missionaries). One would expect continuous arguments and conflicts, but the love of Christ is so strong in these folks that you couldn't get them to break the unity of the Spirit over this. That's one thing I love about my church, and since I'm married to a moderate Arminian, everybody stays happy at home, too. ;)

Blessings,
Derek

9:36 am  
Blogger agonizomai said...

Derek,

and among all the qualified people to present them, you managed to find a Canadian!

Yup! There has always been a remnant up here, too. [/grin]

the next in the series is Calvinism v. Arminianism. Oh boy, I can't wait for that.

I don't know if I'd like that so much. I can't view the two theologies as different aspects of the SAME truth. One is right and the other wrong in the area of depravity and the operation of grace upon it. One glorifies God completely and the other leaves Erasmus' "little something" for man to glory in - and I'd have to say so.

I do agree that many Arminians, deceived though they are on this point (and the other four) are fine and gracious people and are fellow elect, even though they misunderstand. In fact, I think this shows that God's grace is higher and wider than even they know.

That's one thing I love about my church, and since I'm married to a moderate Arminian, everybody stays happy at home, too.

Yeah, but if you were a solid 5 pointer we could fix that. Ooops - that didn't come out right!


Blessings,


Tony

10:43 am  
Blogger Derek Ashton said...

Hey, that's not fair - I AM a 5-pointer. It's just that all of my points have well-rounded paradoxes on them - instead of sharp, jabbing tips.

As a funny aside ... recently after reading Piper's post about TULIP, a friend called me and said: "You know how Piper calls himself a 7 point Calvinist? I think he's actually only a 6.5 point Calvinist." I said, "You gonna tell him?"

I agree, though, that both theologies are not aspects of the SAME truth. Arminians flat out DENY some important Biblical realities. BUT - both theologies are an attempt to systematize the same Gospel. I happen to think Calvinism is the better and more accurate systematization of it, and historically takes more of the data into consideration. Arminians do a particularly poor job of explaining the sovereignty of God, and pt to much emphasis on man's choices as a result. This is obvious to all of us Calvinists, but strangely not obvious at all to our Arminian brothers. It is because of their insistence on certain "self-evident" perspectives (which don't happen to be in the Bible) that they cannot accept Calvinism and claim it is a warped misrepresentation of God. If that is the case, then God has misrepresented Himself (which is impossible!) because historic Calvinism simply reflects the Bible.

I'll argue with Arminians all day long, but in the end we have to realize that it is God alone who can open a person's eyes to the truth. I know, I'm preaching to the choir.

Blessings,
Derek

12:13 pm  
Blogger agonizomai said...

Derek,

I know, I'm preaching to the choir.

Yeah, but when you do...How sweet the sound!

Blessings,


Tony

12:23 pm  

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